Dating for catholics

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The grave sin of divorce infects everybody around it.

It wrecks families and convinces society that Catholic teaching about marriage just isn’t practical.

The president of a Catholic college known for its fidelity guessed that about 5 percent of the marriages of its alums end in divorce. Bible study is just not doing it.”Catholics can sometimes convince themselves that they aren’t part of the same culture as the rest of the world. Worse, a self-righteous faith can lull Catholics into a false sense of security, a new Phariseeism convinced that intellectual assent to the right doctrines — not our humility and God’s mercy — is what saves us.“They think they know everything there is to know about marriage,” said Father Brunetta, “and when they get there and discover it’s not what they expected, they don’t know what to do.

Whatever the number is, it looks awfully high to Catholics who see their friends splitting up. “When I saw the Catholic marriages in this country that are hurting, I wasn’t shocked — I was saddened. But we’re all part of the culture of immediate gratification that doesn’t consider long-term consequences. Most of us have easily dropped relationships, even family ones, to pursue careers and comforts. Shouldn’t faith steel the assenting Catholic against the culture? If we think the answer to the real day-to-day problems of our marriage is going to be found in a paragraph of Andie was a theology major, but it was Doug’s communications major that led him to full-time Catholic work later in life.

So why are so many committed Catholic couples doing it?

“I get the feeling that there is this perverse patronizing that’s going on here,” she said.The Barna Research Group estimates that 25 percent of Catholics who have been married have been divorced — that’s lower than the general population, but high nonetheless.But the group’s research also says that only 49 percent of those Catholics go to Mass on any given week.He is a judge and defender of the bond at the marriage tribunal at the Archdiocese of Hartford, Connecticut, where he’s involved in hundreds of Petitions for Declarations of Invalidity of Marriage (the technical name for an annulment).“My response can only be anecdotal,” he told me.“But in the cases I’ve handled, I would estimate that in somewhere between 5 and 10 percent, at least one member of the couple made an effort to know, study, or follow the Church’s teachings,” he said.

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