Dating website guests online users online

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Hook-up sites that lead members to quick meetings and random liaisons can be used to target people for hate crimes.

A form of catfishing, fake users meet their victims online and then lure them to an isolated location.

The dating site itself could become the target of attack, a breach could lead to the loss of identifying and/or embarrassing information.

ISPs, censors or hostile governments could target or monitor traffic looking for visitors in general, or a specific orientation in particular.

This Valentine’s Day, Pew Research estimated that some 38 percent of U. Last Month, Hong and his team reviewed five “top dating apps,” and found that “all were vulnerable to hacking, containing exploits that would enable breaches similar to the infamous attack on Snapchat … the leaking of users’ data from an HIV-positive dating app.” And while Hong did not disclose which apps his team analyzed in his guest post for Venture Beat, he noted that “the two very most popular we analyzed have been downloaded between 10 million and 100 million times from Google Play alone.” Key to Seworks findings were the fact that all five of the apps were 100 percent decompilable, which Hong explains as “a process that enables hackers to reverse engineer and compromise an app.” Worse yet, “none of the dating apps [they] analyzed had protections to prevent or delay unauthorized decompiling,” and one of the apps “was not using secure communications, making it easy for hackers to intercept data being exchanged between the app and the server.” And perhaps most alarming was the fact that the source code of these apps was obfuscated, or in plain text.

Some of this text included “hard-coded key values, website addresses, and other critical information that could allow hackers access to sensitive data.” But it’s not just apps that are problematic.

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If not, a handy link to a “verification” site takes you to a page where, with a registration and credit card number, you can get verified.To find one all you have to do is create an account and log in, the fake contact requests and private messages will start flooding in and, in some cases, you may even have to upgrade your account to a paid premium service in order to read them.If you’re not sure someone is fake here’s a hint, the messages contain only the simplest and most general types of sentences that could be interpreted in a dozen ways, and get repeated over and over again from message to message.Sure, signing up for Tinder isn’t quite like applying for a credit card, but it should still be noted that many of these online dating services collect quite a bit of data on its users.And according to recent research from security provider Seworks and security tech company Up Guard, dating apps are ripe for the picking when it comes to the next big hack. But according to Min-Pyo Hong of Seworks, these services are all extremely vulnerable to attack.

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